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Pick the Permissions; Android Marshmallow

This blog intends to inform the general public about some of the feature enhancements in the next version of Android (6.0), labelled “Android Marshmallow” focussing on the significance of the permissions list of an application.

Last week Google announced its next version of Android, Android 6.0 nicknamed “Marshmallow”. Though the final release date of Marshmallow is not yet confirmed, here are some of the interesting features included in Marshmallow, by no means an exhaustive list:

  • Android Pay

With this feature users can enter their credit card details and Google will create a virtual account to enable an easy checkout process using the NFC system.

  • Application linking

As of now when a user clicks on a link, a dialog box pops up prompting the user to select one of the available applications like Chrome or another suitable browser application to render the link. With Android Marshmallow, the Android OS verifies the link with the respective application server (provided the corresponding app is installed) and post authentication, with the help of an auto-verify feature (application developers can code an auto-verify feature in their application) the link is opened within the application.

  • Unlock feature

Fingerprint scanner support.

  • Power

Though not security-related it is interesting to know that “Doze Mode” is incorporated to improve the device’s standby time. Using motion detectors, Android will identify if the device is idle or in use. If the device is found idle, Android kills the background processes to improve the battery life.

  • App permissions

Yes! Now I can choose what an application should be allowed to do in real time!. Traditionally, Android applications request the user for their required resource-access permissions at install time. These permissions cannot be modified post installation. With Android Marshmallow, users can choose to allow or deny a specific permission from the permission list of an Android application whilst the application is active. The description of this feature claims that the applications will request for the required permissions the first time the application’s feature is invoked, instead of requesting all the permissions in one go at installation time. As many of Android malware disguise themselves as legitimate applications or are bundled with other legitimate applications, restricting an application based on the permissions (which in turn restricts the app’s functionality) would help increase the security of the user’s device and personal data.

However, users-awareness about the importance of the permissions granted and the functionality of an application is still essential. As we discussed in our previous blog, a taxi-booking application does not typically need permission to access the files in the device’s SD card to perform its functionality. Similarly, a gaming application does not require permission to access contacts information for it to operate. One should be aware about the permissions that should be granted or denied to avail of the application’s actual functionality.

In addition, for Android Marshmallow, if the same permission restrictions hold good for a legitimate security application as well, there is a possibility that a malware with super-user access could modify the granted permissions list of the security application. As suggested by us in our VB2014 paper, updating the Android OS framework such that trusted security applications are loaded earlier than any other application installed could help handling these situations.

Image courtesy:
Androidpit.com

V.Dhanalakshmi
Senior Threat Researcher, K7TCL

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